Five ways to improve clinical supervision using contextual behavioural science: the SHAPE framework

How can the process of clinical supervision be enhanced? It is widely recognised regular supervision is useful for psychological practitioners to offer safe and effective services. Supervision provides relationship-based education and training that supports, manages, develops and evaluates the supervisee and their work. The skilled supervisor fosters a relationship with a supervisee that allows for …

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Top 10 links for 2016 

Another year of tweeting the latest, and the most progressive, research in contextual behavioural science (CBS), along with “fellow traveller” approaches (CBT, mindfulness, metacognition, behaviour analysis etc).  Some trends over the past year:  The rate of CBS publications has increased, particularly for randomised controlled trials of Acceptance & Commitment Therapy. It is hard to keep …

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Creating courageous CBT therapists: how to work with therapist fears about using exposure therapy

Despite a wealth of evidence that it is one of the most effective ways to help people with anxiety disorders, exposure therapy remains underused by clinicians.  As discussed in previous posts, clinicians’ attitudes and practices about exposure are influenced both by their knowledge about the approach and their openness to witnessing client discomfort (and experiencing …

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Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Recovery: a promising low-intensity intervention for people with psychosis

Can mindfulness and acceptance-based psychological approaches help people with psychosis in their personal recovery?  Is it possible to “just notice” the frightening and preoccupying experiences associated with psychosis, such as paranoia, voices, stigmatising thoughts and unusual perceptions? How can psychological therapists help people with serious mental illness to improve their wellbeing and find meaning and …

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LinkFest! Top 10 Links – December 2015

The top ten most-clicked links from my Twitter account in December 2015: 1] Evaluations of self-referential thoughts and their association with components of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy http://j.mp/1lKjE2g ACT-consistent variables were associated with thought evaluations (believability, discomfort & willingness) rather than thought content; believability associated with greater psychological inflexibility and distress; believability of negative thoughts …

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LinkFest! Top 10 links – October 2015

The top ten most-clicked links from my Twitter account in October 2015: 1] Steve Hayes discusses the future of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy – The Situation Has Clearly Changed: So What Are We Going to Do About It? http://j.mp/1Ga4mNz Whether or not you agree with him, when Steve Hayes writes about challenges in the broader CBT …

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